Category Archives: blog

The most private thing I’m willing to admit

The other day, while rushing into a midtown office building to keep an appointment, the security guard at the desk asked where I was going and when I told him, he raised what turned out to be a camera eye at me as I went gliding by. “Hey, did you just take a picture of me?” I asked. And he, “Yes.” Now I’m already around the corner at the elevators, “But you didn’t even ask.” And he: “I’m not supposed to.” Why does this exchange bother me? Perhaps because, along with a steady erosion of our civil rights has come a steady erosion of any sense of privacy. Now, the fact that I’m writing this on a blog would seem to indicate that I’ve tossed all sense of privacy to the wind as I go whirling along here, but that is far from the way that I see it. Ironic? A bit. But I do believe in privacy. I do I do I do.

So, as a poet, who has certainly written poems about her life, what do I mean by privacy? Privacy means I don’t have my photo taken without my permission. Privacy means I choose which words of mine are seen/read by others. Privacy means no one but the person I’m speaking to is privy to my conversation. Privacy means I don’t get frisked by the police because I am about to ride the NYC subways.

But in our era, that’s an impossibility. Every time I enter my bank and use my ATM, I am being photographed. Every time I search online for a product, I will be barraged with ads offering me similar products, at least for the next few weeks. Has my phone been tapped? I’m probably too uninteresting and unthreatening for anyone to bother. However,  I know that because I am a white woman, my chances of being frisked by NYC cops is probably nil. And my chances if I were a black or Latino man, well . . . are much much higher.

There’s a difference between the photo I choose to post and the ones that someone takes of me without my permission.

There’s a difference between what, from my private life, I choose to fashion, transform, into a poem and someone else chooses to steal and use.

It’s not only the lack of privacy; it’s the lack of much conversation about it. Or at least, not enough conversation. Whatever happened on 9/11, it has had one overwhelming effect, helped along by the medium I am using at this moment to communicate: the balance between security and privacy has shifted heavily in the direction of security. Perhaps, in this medium, it’s the balance between the marketplace (the right to sell) and privacy has also shifted in favor of the former.blog/technology-and-liberty/civil-liberties-digital-age-weekly-highlights-682012

The title of this post is taken from one of the profile questions to a popular dating site. It’s a hopeful sign that many people still balk at answering the question.

What is it about electronic readers

Someone gifted me a Kindle. It was never something I would have bought for myself. I’m trying to figure out why I resist reading from it. [Full disclosure: I am still one of those people who gets The New York Times delivered, who rides the subway with a newspaper folded in her hands. Who holds the smooth pages of The New Yorker as she reads.] A year or more ago, I bought and read Sara Bakewell’s How to Live: Or a Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer.http://www.sarahbakewell.com/Montaigne.html I was travelling and it seemed like a good way to read the book instead of lugging along a huge hard cover. And I did read it, but I can barely remember the book and the pencil markings, scratchings, I like to make in a physical book are, of course, not there. “Clippings,” as Kindle calls them, are a different thing altogether. What brought me to thinking about this, while walking the dog today, is why I’m reading for at least 6 months a really terrific book: Ann Patchett’s State of Wonderhttp://www.amazon.com/State-Wonder-Ann-Patchett/dp/0062049801I’m engrossed in reading it when I pick it up, but then put it down for months. For some reason, because I bought it for my Kindle (pace Ann, who is the only major writer I know of who also owns a bookstore), I don’t feel compelled to enter and remain in the world as well. And a different world it is, set mostly in the Amazon jungle with characters that have enough staying power.

I also downloaded the “sample” of my own last book, Burn and Dodgehttp://www.amazon.com/Burn-Dodge-Pitt-Poetry-Series/dp/0822960052, just to see what that would look like. All you get is the first 6 lines of the first poem, which is, aptly, “Regret.”

REGRET

Here’s another sin you’re sunk within
owl-necked looking back
to where you might have been
or what you could have done
to deep you from the muck
you’re stuck standing in.

Okay. Okay. I liked seeing my words on a screen, despite the fact that I had to change the font size so the lineation of the poem wouldn’t change. But what I really want is for readers to hold the volume in their hands. And what I want as a reader is to feel the heft of paper, to smell the smell of new paper, to throw a pencil in to mark my place and to use to pencil in whatever notes I care to make. That said, I do intend to finish reading the book on my Kindle. And when I travel this summer, I probably imagine myself bringing the Kindle along, or else borrowing my son’s ipad.

WHIRLWIND begins

It’s my first post, on this evening when Venus is transiting across the sun.

I’m speechless. But isn’t that what all images and poems do: bring us to the point that transcends language.
It’s the transition from Venus as an evening star to Venus as a morning star, so the scientists say.
I have no idea what this blog will be. Let it be a place for wonder. For poetry. For transitions planetary
as well as personal. The blog takes its name from my new book Whirlwind, which will transit into print this October.
As Bob Dylan says, I was in a whirlwind, now I’m in some better place. Let this be that better place.